A Household Glass Recycling Primer

You break a drinking glass…do you toss it into the garbage or the recycling bin? You might be very tempted to say the recycling bin, but that would be wrong. Though almost all food and beverage containers that you get at the grocery store are meant to be recycled, the glass that you find elsewhere in the house, such as Pyrex dishes, window glass, crystal from the dining room, drinking glasses, and mirrors cannot be transformed into new glass or fiberglass products.

  • CONTACT YOUR LOCAL REFUSE COLLECTION COMPANY TO VERIFY IF THE HOUSEHOLD GLASS SHOULD BE THROWN AWAY OR RECYCLED IN YOUR CURBSIDE BIN

What is Household Glass?

Though we are calling this brief discussion a “household glass” primer, we do have to point out that most of the glass found throughout the home is going to actually contaminate the entire recycling process. Additionally, broken glass is hard for recycling firms to sort out and will often end up in the regular trash.

Why does it matter at all, is glass really toxic to the environment? Not really, but it is simply that it is a material that is easily recycled and repurposed when it is handled correctly. Why waste all of the natural resources in making new glass when recycling is far more effective and efficient?

How do you Succeed in Household Glass Recycling

How is it done? The first thing to know is that you only have to give the glass container a good rinse and you DO NOT have to remove any labels. The metal lids are questionable, and tend to be best left in the regular garbage. Try to keep the colored glass separate from the clear glass, and remember that it is really only the food and beverage containers that qualify as the most readily recycled.

Your curb side recycling firm may not appreciate color sorted glass, but many of the drop off sites are more than happy to accept individual bins of blue, green, brown and clear glass as long as it is all recyclable.